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Writing Process Blog Meme

21 Apr

writerMy dear friend (in the real world as well as the virtual), Shari Pratt, nominated me for this writing process blog meme.If you haven’t visited Shari’s blog, she is quite a verbal artist. The mental images she draws with her words are stunning. She doesn’t post a lot, but what she says is so worth listening to.

The rules of this meme require I answer four questions about how I write and nominate three others. I haven’t done one of these in a long time–I’m generally an award-free blog zone–so bear with me as I stumble along.

What am I working on at the moment?

Too much! Here’s a run-down:

  • my primary WIP is To Hunt a Sub. I’m editing it–final edit (yeah right), with a goal of publishing this summer
  • a series of non-fiction books on integrating technology into the classroom
  • summer workshops for teachers and students (two separate workshops)
  • several articles for ezines I write for

How does my work differ from others of its genre?

I write thrillers, but mine include a lot of tech and science as the plot engine. It’s challenging to simplify for everyone, but provides ample twists and turns I can adopt. I have a few typical characters (a struggling grad student, brilliant undercover cyberwarrior, and a retired SEAL) and an AI named Otto I just love. He’s trying to take over the story. I’ve got control of him pretty well in this book, but the sequel–he breaks out.

That’s my long way of answering your question–my work is different because of this AI character.

Why do I write what I do?

I love the characteristics of mysteries and thrillers. They are always good plots and interesting characters. I enjoy trying to solve the problems ahead of the characters. Plus, their very nature–strong but damaged characters, fragile and superhero in equal measures, who fight the good fight, always growing by the end of the story and always a happy ending (indicating time well spent on this endeavor) appeals to my reading nature.

How does my writing process work?

I sit down. I write. Always on the computer. Usually between 7am and 8pm. I’m too tired by later. I jump between topics, focusing first on what must be completed by the earliest deadline.

That’s it! Time for nominations. I would like to nominate these three writers to participate in a Writing Process Blog Meme:

Random RoseRose

Confessions of a Writer--James

How the Cookie Crumbles–Tess

If you accept my nomination, you will write an article prompted by the following four questions and post it on your blog on Monday, May 5, 2014. You’ll also nominate three writers of your choice to post their articles on their blogs on April 28, 2014 (Tess: If you’re not back from China yet–and settled in–do it whenever you can!). The four questions:

What am I working on at the moment?
How does my work differ from others of its genre?
Why do I write what I do?
How does my writing process work?

I completely understand if this ‘isn’t your thing’. No obligation. Just having fun!


Jacqui Murray is the author of the popular Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy, and the thriller, To Hunt a Sub. She is also the author/editor of over a hundred books on integrating tech into education, adjunct professor of technology in education, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, a columnist for TeachHUB, monthly contributor to Today’s Author and a freelance journalist on tech ed topics. You can find her books at her publisher’s website, Structured Learning. The sequel to To Hunt a Sub, Twenty-four Days, will be out this summer. Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, CSG Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing Teachers, CAEP reviewer, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. You can find her resources at Structured Learning.


 
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